ART 2.0 Launches CourseProfile Service

Academic Reporting Tools 2.0 (ART 2.0), a suite of data visualization services that render U-M course and academic program data in order to help students, faculty, and administration make informed decisions, has released a first service to campus called CourseProfile. The tool was developed by a team within the Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG), part of the Office of Digital Education & Innovation (DEI), led by Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Physics and Astronomy August Evrard.

ART 2.0 aims to provide robust data on courses and programs from past academic terms in a user-friendly format to further enable personalized and engaged learning on campus. By increasing the amount of information available for students and faculty alike, ART 2.0 is fostering a community that leverages data for better decision making and opportunities at U-M, promotes transparency and serves as a driving force for innovation. Additionally, the tool harnesses data to improve understanding of how learning procedures and teaching practices affect learning while providing more insights into courses, academic programs and student learning at U-M. Currently, data is available for nearly 9,000 courses across U-M.

ART 2.0 is an updated and extended version of a service tool originally developed in 2006 by the LSA Information Technology Advisory Committee. That service focused on data surrounding course enrollment, grade correlations among courses, the impact of standardized test scores on course performance, and other curricular features. In 2014, ART 1.0 was selected as a program to be scaled up through DIG in order to enhance its impact and usefulness as a tool for faculty, staff and students.

The Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) consists of a team of software developers, user experience designers, behavioral scientists and multi-disciplinary student fellows that works directly with user communities within U-M in order to provide resources for homegrown educational software innovations on campus and scale up these digital enterprises to maturity through collaboration across U-M’s digital ecosystem.

DEI aims to redefine public residential education at a 21st century research university through the creative use of technology and targeted experimentation with digital programs in order to enable engaged, personalized and lifelong learning for the entire Michigan community and learners around the world. DEI houses three labs, the Digital Innovation Greenhouse, the Digital Education & Innovation Lab and the Learning, Education, & Design Lab, within its infrastructure. To date, U-M has reached more than 4 million lifelong learners through MOOCs developed by faculty in partnership with DEI and continues to be a pioneer in digital learning and learning analytics.

The ART 2.0 CourseProfile service is available to the U-M campus community at Academic Reporting Tools 2.0

University of Michigan to Launch Four MichiganX MOOCs

This spring the Office of Digital Education & Innovation (DEI) will launch its first four courses on edX: Finance for Everyone: Smart Tools for Decision-Making; Data Science Ethics; Social Work: Meeting the Challenges of a New Era; and Practical Learning Analytics. With these four massive open online courses (MOOCs), DEI continues to progress towards its goal to transform at least 200 courses by 2017, to advance its vision of equitable and advanced education for all, and create a world that harnesses technology and learning analytics to provide high quality personalization at scale.

“Our first four MichiganX MOOCs reflect our aspirations to make the resources of the university available to the broadest possible range of global learners,” says James DeVaney, Associate Vice Provost for Digital Education & Innovation. “We have learned a great deal from our first 40 MOOCs and continue to seed faculty-led academic innovation aligned with our values of diversity, inclusion, and academic excellence.”

Professor Gautam Kaul, already an established proponent of MOOCs, DEI’s Innovator in Residence, and the creator of one of the world’s most popular MOOCs, developed Finance for Everyone: Smart Tools for Decision-Making to provide a framework for a lifetime of smart decision making based on finance theory. Professor Kaul is aims to open up finance theory to new audiences, especially those who otherwise may have limited access to formalized tools and resources to learn about finance. According to the Global Financial Literacy Survey, only one third of the world’s population is considered financially literate; in the US, women experience a gender gap of negative ten percentage points compared to men with regards to  financial knowledge. The Finance for Everyone MOOC serves as an approachable gateway into the financial domain for a diverse, global and novice audience by providing a framework that provides tools for a lifetime of smart decision making.

Professor H.V. Jagadish designed Data Science Ethics to cultivate guidelines for ethical practices that are broadly applicable throughout the data science field. As an expert in data science, Professor Jagadish has worked to leverage data to promote social good through a Gates Foundation Grant and has contributed to publications such as Slate Magazine, U.S. News and The Conversation US on topics related to the ethical use of data before bringing data science ethics to a broader range of learners though this MOOC.  Professor Jagadish designed this course, which aims to set the standard for ethical data science practices in data science, to reach global learners and also provide high quality courseware that can be used by current U-M students interested in data science. A multitude of audiences, including novice learners, students and practitioners in all fields of study and industry, will find this MOOC integral for addressing issues regarding ethics, data ownership and privacy in data science.

Social Work: Meeting the Challenges of a New Era is a modular online course developed by Professors Mary Ruffolo, Barbara Hiltz, and Katie Richards-Schuster as a way to explore the foundations of social work as a profession. As the first MOOC from the U-M School of Social Work, it defines the Michigan perspective on the social work profession for a broad, global audience through a progressive series of online modules. Learners interested in exploring a career in social work will examine the integration of practice and theory while exploring postgraduate options in order to further delve into the role of social work. In addition, through this MOOC, Michigan will engage incoming Master of Social Work students as they enter the program.  

Already an established and successful MOOC, Practical Learning Analytics will soon be available on the edX platform. Professor Tim McKay initially introduced Practical Learning Analytics as the first U-M MOOC to encourage group participation and dialogue as a model for participation. This unique learning model focuses on analytical approaches to make personalized data actionable in order to improve learning. Having already reached over 3,000 learners, Practical Learning Analytics aims to help other institutions use their own learning analytics effectively in order to improve curricula and teaching methods. The MOOC will feature a more succinct model that increases the interactive learner experience and provide learners with more autonomy in selecting course material, thereby increasing the accessibility of Practical Learning Analytics to a broader audience.     

edX was founded in 2012 to increase global access to high-quality education for everyone via online learning and the enhancement of teaching and learning through research. edX has forged partnerships with over 90 members, including partnering with U-M as a Charter Member in October, 2015. It  is the only nonprofit and open source MOOC provider and online learning destination.

DEI aims to shape the future of learning and redefine public residential education at a 21st century research university by unlocking new opportunities and enabling personalized, engaged, and lifelong learning for the U-M community and learners around the world. To date, U-M has reached more than 4 million lifelong learners through MOOCs developed by faculty in partnership with DEI and continues to be a pioneer in digital learning and learning analytics. As a part of a diverse, digital innovation strategy to ultimately enable lifelong learners to change the world U-M partners with edX, Coursera and NovoEd.

Enrollment is currently open for Finance for Everyone, which will begin on April 5, Data Science Ethics, which will begin on May 1. Social Work and Practical Learning Analytics will both launch on July 1. For additional information and/or to enroll please visit MichiganX.

M-Write Joins the Digital Innovation Greenhouse  Portfolio

M-Write has officially become the fifth project housed within the Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) portfolio. As the most recent addition to the DIG portfolio within the Office of Digital Education & Innovation (DEI), M-Write is a project that will leverage the resources, guidance and tools available through DIG in order to facilitate and scale up the implementation of writing-to-learn pedagogies, enhancing student learning and individualized feedback for students in large gateway courses on the U-M campus.

M-Write will leverage ECoach, another initiative housed in the DIG Portfolio, in new ways in order to work with user communities across the U-M campus. ECoach will be used by M-Write to provide personalized feedback to students based on automated and peer assessments of their writing, enabling students from diverse disciplines to participate in content-focused writing activities. Additionally, M-Write will incorporate conceptual writing prompts, automated peer review with rubrics and natural language processing.

M-Write joins GradeCraft, ECoach, Student Explorer and Academic Reporting Toolkit 2.0 (ART 2.0) initiatives; structured digital engagement tools that assist in implementing personalized learning at scale in a residential learning environment. ART 2.0 is a data visualization tool that focuses on supporting curricular decisions with evidence to foster more informed decision making. Student Explorer leverages course performance data to render real time updates on course progress in order to facilitate future student success, while ECoach provides personalized feedback and advice to students in large, introductory courses as well as the Honors Program cohort. GradeCraft, also recently added to the DIG portfolio, is a learning management system that supports gameful learning in the classroom. These initiatives highlight a few of the many ways DIG is partnering with faculty innovators to investigate, design and use learning technologies at U-M, as well as how DEI continues its commitment to accelerate digital education and innovation in learning in order to transform 200 courses by 2017.

Anne Gere, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, Gertrude Buck Collegiate Professor of Education and English Language and Literature,  Director of the Sweetland Writing Center and Second Vice President of the Modern Language Association partnered with Ginger Shultz, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, to develop and test M-Write in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and the College of Engineering. M-Write is the recipient of a $1.8M grant from the Third Century Initiative Transforming Learning for a Third Century (TLTC) program. M-Write will initially serve 5,000 students through the introduction of writing-to-learn pedagogies in large introductory courses on campus with the intent of reaching over 10,000 students over the lifetime of the project.

The Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) consists of software developers, user experience designers, behavioral scientists and multi-disciplinary student fellows who work with user communities to provide resources for homegrown educational software innovations on campus and scale up these digital enterprises to maturity through collaboration across U-M’s digital ecosystem.

Coach John Beilein Shares Leadership Insights in New Online Course

Coach John Beilein, head coach for the Michigan Wolverines, shares his insights on leadership and building successful teams in a new massive open online course (MOOC), Leading Teams, designed for lifelong learners including University of Michigan Alumni.

This course is part of the Leading People and Teams Specialization, a series of MOOCs created by Professors Scott DeRue and Maxim Sytch of the Ross School of Business that combine the excellence of U-M academics and athletics. From his decades of leadership, Coach Beilein brings a practitioner’s point of view to the Specialization through his featured lessons, demonstrating the importance of strong leadership skills, both on and off the court.

Through his interview segments, Coach Beilein discusses his approach to building and sustaining cohesive teams and developing talent while aligning individual and team goals through strong leadership. His lessons provide an engaging and practical approach to skills that can be learned and applied to a variety of contexts.

The Leading People and Teams Specialization is comprised of four courses that culminate in a capstone project and enable learners to understand and apply principles of leadership to their daily lives. The Leading Teams course, which will feature leadership insights from Coach Beilein, is now available. To learn more about the course and/or to enroll: Leading Teams course.

For more on Coach Beilein’s lessons in Leading Teams: Ed Kengerski of Michigan Sports Television highlights the collaboration between Ross School of Business and U-M Athletics in this video.

For additional information on the Leading People and Teams Specialization, please visit the DEI website.

Digital Innovation Greenhouse Welcomes GradeCraft

Gradecraft, a learning management system dedicated to supporting the gameful classroom, has officially become the fourth project within the Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) portfolio. This incorporation is another step towards continuous innovative growth to shape the future of higher education within the Office of Digital Education & Innovation (DEI).

GradeCraft will be able to harness existing DIG resources around software development, infrastructure expertise, and user experience design to scale up technology through the Greenhouse’s extended resources in order to increase the application’s reach to over 20,000 students at U-M over the next three years. Alternately, GradeCraft will add another layer of expertise to DIG with the introduction of new programming languages and project management expertise, including coordination with external software development resources. These additional capabilities will further support the core functions of the DIG Gradecraft project team as they focus on software development, user experience design and user community mobilization as pathways towards furthering future digital collaborations at U-M.

GradeCraft joins ECoach, Student Explorer and Academic Reporting Toolkit 2.0 (ART 2.0) as the fourth portfolio project within DIG. ART 2.0 focuses on fostering increased student engagement through the dissemination of personalized information to better inform student decision making. Student Explorer leverages course performance data to provide students and advisors with real time updates on course progress, while ECoach provides personalized feedback and advice to students in large, introductory courses.These projects highlight just a few of the many ways DEI is partnering with faculty innovators to investigate, design and use learning technologies to to develop tools to facilitate personalization at scale at the University.

GradeCraft was designed by Professor Barry Fishman and doctoral student Caitlin Holman as a web application to support learning environments to better support students’ intrinsic motivation. Developed in partnership with DEI and the Learning Analytics Task Force,  GradeCraft has been used by over 2,000 students across 40 courses to date, and was awarded a $1.88 million grant from the Transforming Learning for a Third Century (TLTC) program through the Third Century Initiative.

The Digital Innovation Greenhouse (DIG) is comprised of a team of software developers, user experience designers, behavioral scientists and multi-disciplinary student fellows that work with user communities in order to provide resources for homegrown educational software innovations on campus and scale up these digital enterprises to maturity through collaboration across U-M’s digital ecosystem.

James Hilton Receives Leadership Award

James HiltonOn October 27 James Hilton, Vice Provost for Digital Education & Innovation and the Dean of Libraries, will receive the 2015 Leadership Award for his visionary leadership in transforming higher education. The Leadership Award is the highest recognition of achievement given at the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference and celebrates the exemplary leadership showcased by its recipients through their advocacy of information technology in higher education.

“James brings a deep understanding of the academy and broad and bold thinking to his work on some of the biggest and most difficult challenges and opportunities facing higher education and information technology. His visionary leadership and distinctive personal style serve as an inspiration for those he has worked with in the academic community.” – EDUCAUSE  

As the Vice Provost for Digital Education & Innovation, Hilton has helped usher in an age fueled by technology, connection, evidence and analytics at U-M. His leadership has helped centralize technology and digital programs residentially while guiding the department and the university, as a whole, to lead the way in transforming higher education through a diverse array of initiatives including experimentation with programs, technology, learning analytics, digital communities.

Through his work as University Librarian and Dean of Libraries and Vice Provost of Digital Education & Innovation at U-M, James Hilton spearheads the development of campus-wide strategies, policies and programs on educational technology. A nationally recognized leader in technology issues around higher education, he has led, championed and fostered technology initiatives that cross boundaries between institutions, and between academic and information technology units. His impact on higher education has spanned more than three decades, during which he co-founded the Sakai Project, a collaborative effort to create open software, provided early support to Internet2 NET+ and Duraspace, and helped spearhead the development of the Unizin Consortium, a partnership of universities of universities that is empowering participating institutions to exert greater control over the infrastructure, content, and data that both drive and emerge from the expanding digital learning landscape.

Throughout his career, Hilton has led the exploration and use of technology. He began his career at the University of Michigan as a faculty member within the Department of Psychology and held numerous leadership roles including Associate Provost for Academic, Information and Instructional Technology and Affairs and Interim University Librarian. Prior to his current roles at U-M, he was Vice President and Chief Information Officer at the University of Virginia. He serves on many boards, including Internet2, DuraSpace, DPN, and HathiTrust Board of Governors. His extensive published works encompass the topics of person perception, stereotypes, information technology policy and the psychology of suspicion.

At the EDUCAUSE Annual Conference 2015, Hilton will present a featured talk on Leading and Partnering Strategically Across the Academy that will address the importance of collaboration in higher education to achieve a transformative future through shared vision and actions.

New MOOC, Practical Learning Analytics, Encourages Group Participation

Professor Tim McKay has created a new massive open online course (MOOC) called Practical Learning Analytics to address the typical challenges faculty, staff, administrators and students face to gather, access and analyze data in direct, practical ways.

The course builds upon U-M’s leadership in learning analytics and is the next innovation in a series of initiatives that have sought to make personalized data actionable on a large scale to empower students, faculty, and staff to make better informed choices to improve learning.

Based on Michigan’s on-campus Learning Analytics Fellows program, the course focuses on analytical approaches that anyone can take, and offers a number of innovative approaches that differentiate it from other open online courses. For instance, the course offers a practical approach by providing students with real sample data and code to help facilitate analysis.

Practical Learning Analytics is also the first U-M MOOC to encourage group participation and dialogue as an ideal model for participation. The course is structured to accommodate as many tastes and needs as possible, allowing learners to select their own level of involvement. Professor McKay recommends dividing course content among a group of peers and  exploring notes and key themes in weekly ongoing discussions to help students explore the full content of the course while learning from the perspectives and insights from peers.

Practical Learning Analytics is also bridging impact with global lifelong learners with unique on-campus opportunities for current students. On October 20, the Digital Innovation Greenhouse within the Office of Digital Education & Innovation (DEI) will host a student hackathon where students will utilize data sets from the online course.

Enrollment is currently open for Practical Learning Analytics, which launches on October 5. For additional information and/or to enroll, please visit https://www.coursera.org/course/pla.

New Specialization: Leading People and Teams

Professors Scott DeRue and Maxim Sytch of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan have created a new series of online courses called Leading People and Teams.

This series of online courses (Specialization) will consist of 4 courses that build up to a capstone project, all with an applied nature, which enable learners to understand and apply principles of leadership to their daily lives. Topics include motivating employees by setting goals, giving structured feedback, and fostering trust, collaboration and vision alignment among team members. Through the Capstone, students will apply these skills to advise leading executives on real-world management challenges.

This Specialization builds upon the teaching and research experience of Scott DeRue and Maxim Sytch, both of whom were recently placed in the top 40 business professors under the age of 40. Scott DeRue has been reported to be among the 50 most influential business professors in the world and recently summited Mt. Everest as a way to understand how to create commitment for teams under pressure. Maxim Sytch has had his research published in leading journals and in 2014 won the Ross Executive Education Teaching Impact Award.

Enrollment is currently open for the first course in the Specialization, which will begin on September 15. For additional information and/or to enroll, please visit https://www.coursera.org/learn/motivate-people-teams.

Creators

DeRue

Scott DeRue
Associate Dean and Professor of Management
Management and Organizations, Ross School of Business
University of Michigan

Sytch

Maxim Sytch
Associate Professor of Management and Organizations Michael R. and Mary Kay Hallman Fellow
Management and Organizations, Ross School of Business
University of Michigan

Cheri

Cheri Alexander
Chief Innovation Officer and Executive Director Corporate Learning
Adjunct Lecturer in Management and Organizations, Ross School of Business
University of Michigan

Guest Lectures

John Beilein
Head Coach, University of Michigan Men’s Basketball Team

Jeff Brodsky
Chief Human Resource Officer, Morgan Stanley

Rich Sheridan
CEO, Menlo Innovations

 

New Specialization Intro to Finance: Valuation and Investing

Professor Gautam Kaul at the Ross School of Business has created a new series of online courses called Introduction to Finance: Valuation and Investing.

This series of online courses (Specialization) will consist of 4 integrated courses that build up to a capstone project, all with an applied nature, which enable learners to understand and apply the principles of valuation to many of the personal and professional decisions we confront on a daily basis. Topics include time value of money and decision making, risk-return, bonds, stocks, alternative methods for valuation, as well as valuing projects and companies.

This Specialization builds upon Gautam’s experience leading the Introduction to Finance online course (which has reached over 800K students since 2012), teaching an innovative Global Finance course in the Executive Education program, and development of digital assets for the Master of Business Administration program’s Fast Track in Finance curriculum.

Enrollment is currently open for the first course in the specialization, which will begin on September 15. For additional information and/or to enroll, please visit https://www.coursera.org/course/timevalueofmoney. We also invite you to join the conversation for the course by using the course hashtag #UMFIE (Finance Is Everywhere).

Creators

Gautam
Professor Gautam Kaul
Professor of Finance & Fred M. Taylor Professor of Business Administration
Ross School of Business
University of Michigan
@UMGautamKaul

Lei
Qin Lie
Lecturer
Ross School of Business
University of Michigan